Book Review: Think Again

Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don’t Know by Adam M. Grant

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


‘Learning requires the humility to realize one has something to learn.’ So saith Adam Grant, author of Think Again, one of the more insightful and (literally) thought-provoking books I’ve read in a long time. A possible alternate subtitle might be ‘Tearing down our siloes.’ The author offers nothing less than a way out of our current rigid thinking, reinforced by social media, and enhanced by the echo chamber of confirmation bias.


One of the first challenges any of us encounters interacting with others is the tribal urge, the powerful need to obtain the approval of others, and to not receive argument in return. Grant says the tradition of arguing should be returned to respectability, since, as he writes, ‘arguing with somebody is not a sign of disrespect; it’s a sign of respect. It means I value (that person’s) view enough to argue about it. If I didn’t consider it worthwhile, I wouldn’t bother.’


He continues, addressing most of the common fallacies we hold about confrontation, and argument, and the value of letting go of long-cherished opinions. One method of letting them go, or at least starting a civil conversation with someone we disagree with is to ask: ‘How do you know?’ The key is, we need to ask ourselves that question as well.


A few lasting lessons from Think Again are these: Don’t confuse confidence with competence; meaning is healthier than happiness; the greatest discoveries have come not from ‘Eureka’ moments, but from ‘That’s funny’ moments; and just because it’s the HIPPO—the HIghest Paid Person’s Opinion—doesn’t make it right.Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don’t Know



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